Food labels can be confusing. The dietitian breaks it down.

Food labels can be confusing for everyone. Dietitian and nutrition educator Amber Pankonin explains everything to us.



Hi, I’m Amber Pink Linen. I am a dietician and personal chef. And today I’m here to talk to you about food labels and GMO foods. It’s inside the pantry. Thus, GMO stands for genetically modified organism. And most people think of GMOs as an ingredient when in fact they are a process. It is a process used by plant breeders which is useful in improving a plant. What they’re going to do is take a trait from one plant and transfer it to another in order to improve the plant at the end of the day. It gives the consumer very safe, affordable and healthy food. I think people think there is a ton of GMO foods out there. And really, there are only 10 approved GMO foods on the market today that include corn, cotton, canola, soybeans, sugar, beets, alfalfa, some potatoes, and some forms of. apples. So, one of my favorite GMO foods is the arctic apple. And this apple does not turn brown. So once you cut it you can leave it out for a few hours and it won’t brown. It’s nutritionally amazing they are the same but you probably won’t waste food or waste these apples so much when you buy the arctic apple. One of the first GMO products to hit the market many years ago was the flavor preserving tomato. However, this is not available today. So there are no GMO tomatoes on the market today. However, you’re going to see this label, this non-GMO label on this box of diced tomatoes next to this box that doesn’t have the label and there’s about 30 cents difference between those two boxes. There are so many different food labels, even as a registered dietitian with a background in nutritional science. Food labels can be confusing for me, so I understand how confusing it can really be for the average consumer. So it’s whole kernel corn and this one has the non-GMO label and then the one with natural sea salt, the term natural could mean a lot of different things. There is no formal definition of the word natural, but also with sea salt. I think when people see this they think maybe it’s healthier. However, it still contains the same amount of sodium as kosher salt or iodized salt. So there is really no nutritional value in looking for sea salt. Certain terms are regulated. So, for example, the term low sodium when it comes to the non-GMO label is something they can choose from. It is therefore by no means a requirement that they pay for this label to be affixed. This may absence. Labeling is basically a marketing strategy where brands try to communicate that that particular product is something free and sometimes that can be a good thing in terms of sodium or fat, where consumers seek to avoid these types of. nutrients. However, when it comes to GMO foods, there really is no need to put this on a label. So here we have cranberry juice. Again, there is the non-GMO label on it. There are no GMO cranberries on the market today. Again, this is just another example of absence labeling. The use of GMOs is therefore just one more tool in the toolbox of our farmers and producers. So we can use less water, we can use less pesticides and again it gives us better returns. So it’s not only better for the environment, but also for us as consumers. mm

Food labels can be confusing for everyone. Dietitian and nutrition educator Amber Pankonin explains everything to us.

GMO-free, organic, made with real sea salt; Food labels can be confusing for everyone. Dietitian and nutrition educator Amber Pankonin explains everything to us.

GMO-free, organic, made with real sea salt; Food labels can be confusing for everyone. Dietitian and nutrition educator Amber Pankonin explains everything to us.

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